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OrganicORGANIC Flour

What is Organic?

Certified Organic products are grown and processed without the use of synthetic chemicals, fertilisers, or GMOs. It is an innovative method of farming and production – and is increasingly becoming recognised as being on the leading edge of food and fibre technology into the future.

Organics is not just chemical free by testing. It is about the way your food is grown and handled. The whole system is linked – Soil, Plants, Animals, Food, People, the Environment.

Standards to achieve this are internationally recognised, and are assured through annual audits of all certified operators by an independent third party auditor.

Organic agriculture is a production system that sustains the health of soils, ecosystems and people. It relies on ecological processes, biodiversity and cycles adapted to local conditions, rather than the use of inputs with adverse effects. Organic agriculture combines tradition, innovation and science to benefit the shared environment and promote fair relationships and a good quality of life for all involved.

The organic movement began in the 1930s and 1940s as a reaction to agriculture's growing reliance on synthetic fertilizers. Artificial fertilizers had been created during the 18th century, initially with superphosphates and then ammonia derived fertilizers. These early fertilizers were cheap, powerful, and easy to transport in bulk. The 1940s has been referred to as the 'pesticide era'.

As environmental awareness and concern increased, the originally supply-driven movement became demand-driven. As a proportion of total global agricultural output, organic output remains small, but it has been growing rapidly in many countries, notably in Europe and Australia. Agriculture in general imposes external costs upon society through pesticides, nutrient runoff, excessive water usage, and assorted other problems. As organic methods minimize some of these factors, organic farming is believed to impose fewer external costs upon society

Organic farming is distinguished by formal standards regulating production methods, and in some cases, final output. Standards may be voluntary or legislated.

Source: Wholegrain